DO ROADSHOWS WORK? A PERSONAL ANECDOTE

A TRANSFORMATIONAL JOURNEY OF A CORPORATE SECRETARIAL
BECOMING A RAW FOOD EDUCATOR THROUGH A PASTLIFE EXPERIENCE

DO ROADSHOWS WORK? A PERSONAL ANECDOTE

Today, after spending hours at my PC and feeling the onset of migraine coming on (likely because I’ve been neglecting my laptop neck stretches), I decided to move locations – which means changing cafés.

Despite the mounting articles to write, I took the opportunity to relax the mind to prevent the potential onslaught of stress and pain of a full migraine, and walk for a bit of inspiration.

I came across a couple of pop-up banners planted in the Tajong Pagar MRT. Feeling at that point like I needed a good strong elbow in my back, a beaming Malay lady called me over to sample a massage. Usually the type to speed past clipboards or leaflet holders, I surprised myself when I walked over. A quick glance at the banner told me I was in for overview of discounted facials, body spas and bundles. The prices were listed, bold and inhibited, so I felt comfortable I wouldn’t be surprised with any five-star prices I’d have to haggle out of.

Nancy sat me down, told me to relax and gave me a deep tissue neck rub. It felt a bit odd sitting in the middle of the MRT trying to mask the bliss on my face, but I soon forgot about it. At that moment I felt so relaxed and grateful, I began looking at the leaflets on my own accord.

“How much are the treatments, really?” I asked suspiciously thinking a 45 minute massage that was this good couldn’t really be $23. But it was, and if you bought three it was even cheaper. I’m not an impulse buyer, but at that moment I felt so good (my muscles and head felt even better) and pleased at the no gimmick approach, that I bought the whole thing, thanking Nancy and her jovial partner over and over until I ended up showing her photos of my family.

What’s my point here? Roadshows work when you have the right ingredients: a product people would buy, a way to showcase through value and not badgering, transparent marketing material and good old-fashioned smiling customer service.

Don’t believe me? According to Simmons Market Research Bureau, 91% in a survey ranked trade shows as “extremely useful” for product purchasing information, effectively ranking higher than on-site visits. To top it off, almost half of the respondents purchased products or services. At a typical trade show yields around 200 visitors a day, proving more productive than sales calls.

So for most companies, trade shows are worth the effort. Just remember to smile and loose the predatory energy and clip board :)

 

Related posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *