TO START A BUSINESS YOU HAVE TO SLAY YOUR DEMONS

How to write good copy
GET THEM AT THE FIRST SENTENCE (HOW TO WRITE GOOD COPY)

TO START A BUSINESS YOU HAVE TO SLAY YOUR DEMONS

How to start a business www.amandablum.com brand storytelling

Bit of a dramatic title.

Or is it?

I’ve already said that I believe business is a spiritual journey and that success is dependent on our ability to mitigate fear and self-sabotage.

Make no mistake, many of the things we go through: confusion, over-thinking, overwhelm and stuck-ness are the weeds that grow from fear.

Fear doesn’t like to call itself fear.

Procrastination, rationalisation, distraction and busy-ness are so much easier to digest. 

They’re a way of avoiding the real questions:

  • What do you really want to do?
  • Why do you want to do it?
  • What do you need to do to make it happen?
  • What fear do you need to conquer?
  • What support do you need?
  • What’s your next step?

When it comes to unraveling your story and starting a business, fear always threatens the process.

If you’ve been thinking about starting a business but haven’t been able to start, ask yourself this one question:

Do you really want to? 

If the answer is YES, its time to stop thinking and start acting. 

You don’t need to know what to do.

You don’t need to know the answers. You just need to take daily action. Even if the first action is to talk to people about it.

YOU NEED TO TAKE THE IDEA OUT OF YOUR HEAD AND PUT IT IN THE REAL WORLD.  

Trust the next step will appear. 

Last year I received a message on Facebook from a distant friend. 

“Hey, I heard you do branding, can we meet up? I’m thinking about starting a business” 

She’d been employed for 12 years, never ran a business and after 4 years of thinking about it, she finally reached out.

Within 11 months of sending that message, she formed a business model, a brand, website, rented a store location, trade-marked her service, quit her job and launched the business with over 70 clients in tow.

A lot of the process was confronting fears head-on and putting a plan together to make her vision a reality.

There were also calculated risks and potential for failure. 

Steep learning curves.

Moments of self-doubt. 

As well as moments of clarity, faith, conviction, joy and empowerment. 

Moments when she realised it wasn’t just an idea in her head – that she had the power to materialise it.

All she had to do was take a step. And another step. And another.

 

 

Related posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *